sartorias: (brain)
I am pretty much guaranteed to always be a day late and a dollar short, but even I stumble onto contemporary happenings, mostly through reading blogs, and I discovered that today is Star Wars Day.

It won't last, unless some big gun figures a way to make money off it, but meanwhile we can think back to our experiences. Like standing in lines in 1977, in an atmosphere of exhilaration. My co-writer Dave T. and I would walk over to Hollywood Blvd at around midnight and get into line for the two thirty or four o'clock a.m. showing, as that was when the eternal line got shortest. The air was usually redolent with Maui Wowee, and people passed back and forth cheap bottles of wine, etc. Nobody had thought of working the line as vendors, which I understand happens now: there was a humongoid line for Hamilton tx a few days ago, and I was told vendors were there. Same atmosphere of party and shared expectation and enjoyment.

So there was also a post about Star Wars figures, triggering memory. In 1993, my son's bio dad showed up unexpectedly one day, after two years of silence. (We stayed with him and bio-mom for the two weeks before son's birth, then we drove the 700 miles down here, and he and bio-mom split up. As this was an open adoption, we heard from her often, but not from him until this day.) He carried a shoe box under one arm. He looked around our shabby furniture (most of which, alas, we still have, those that haven't fallen apart) and our wall to wall bookcases, and dominating the living room the gigantic plastic castle we'd bought so Son could climb inside when he couldn't be outside. Eccentric as we and our space is, Bio-dad seemed content (his growing up had been pretty fraught). He stayed maybe half an hour, during which he handed us the shoe box, which turned out to be mostly full of Star Wars figures that he'd played with as a little kid in the late seventies and early eighties. He hadn't had many toys, but those he'd had he'd saved in this box.

We promptly handed them off to the son, who played with them happily for several years. A few of them got chewed up by various rescue dogs over the years, and some got lost, but those that survived years of imaginary battles I scooped up when the son moved on to video games, and now I have that box in the closet, in case some day he has kids of his own.

Tatooine

Jul. 4th, 2012 08:58 am
sartorias: (Default)
I love the unexpected ways that fiction intersects with life, Like this trip to the set of Tatooine, still there--and someone's home.

Still mean to do a riff on the strange history of Vril.

Tatooine

Jul. 4th, 2012 08:58 am
sartorias: (Default)
I love the unexpected ways that fiction intersects with life, Like this trip to the set of Tatooine, still there--and someone's home.

Still mean to do a riff on the strange history of Vril.
sartorias: (Default)
In welcoming Dave Trowbridge to BVC, and sorta sideways celebrating the appearance of book two of Ruler of Naught, I reminisce here about STAR WARS and about those moments when a piece of art gets right down into your DNA and forces you to respond.
sartorias: (Default)
In welcoming Dave Trowbridge to BVC, and sorta sideways celebrating the appearance of book two of Ruler of Naught, I reminisce here about STAR WARS and about those moments when a piece of art gets right down into your DNA and forces you to respond.
sartorias: (Default)
A couple of posts today coincided in a way that got me thinking about how stories can alter just by when we encounter them in the arc. Here [livejournal.com profile] mrissa talks about those of us who never mind spoilers (and who dislike being startled, sometimes the two are related) and those who can't bear spoilers. Then, here, [livejournal.com profile] krylyr wonders which of the Star Wars movies to show first to his kids, and why.

Whoa, I hadn't thought of that. With my own kids, they'd already seen the first three on VCR before Phantom Menace (if that's the right name of the first prequel) appeared. So they saw those in the same order we did, only on TV, not in the theater, without all the wondering and excitement between.

Oh. The Monday following the first appearance of that first prequel, I was talking to some parents at school. Several maintained sadly that kids these days were jaded, and gone forever was the delirious excitement that possessed us when the first SW film came out summer of '77. Everyone, including kids, had got too sophisticated, and no one would ever feel that way about a movie again. I didn't want to say anything--this was just after release weekend, no reactions yet at large--I was afraid I'd sound like a tedious snob if I talked about how I'd been checking my watch, how despite the beauty of the sets, and some nifty bits, the dialog had seemed awfully wooden at times. There was only the faintest glimmer of the crackling fun of the first film. I did say that my son did not want to see it again, unlike my brother in 1977, at exactly the same age.


Okay, seque up. The next two have come out, each with jaw-dropping effects and devastatingly cement-heavy dialog and directing despite the actors' valiant efforts. But then the first three come out on DVD, and of course we get the set, and rewatch them all shiny and remastered, unlike our grainy VCR tapes taken off the TV with a third of the screen cut out.

As we're watching it, the familiar old lines take on new ironies, meanings, twists. So . . . would it be better to make someone sit through the first three, so that older ones take on all that freight of added meaning? Kids don't notice wooden dialog, do they? The perfect age for the prequels seems to be about ten. Or maybe the best entry place would be with the original Star Wars film (now called A New Hope if I'm not mistaken), so that the viewer experiences the story the way we did. That way the viewer can bring to those wooden first three all the story baggage, to make them slightly more palatable.

Has anyone experienced them differently than those of us who were around in '77? Or maybe there is no answer that fits everyone, as Mrissa brought up with respect to spoilers, and connecting bits of story across the arcs.

All my life I've enjoyed the reread effect. That is, I love the first surprise of a good piece, and then there's the reread, when I look forward to revisiting the story now that I have its shape, and how I missed this bit, or that bit reverberates with meanings hidden on my first encounter, etc.
sartorias: (Default)
A couple of posts today coincided in a way that got me thinking about how stories can alter just by when we encounter them in the arc. Here [livejournal.com profile] mrissa talks about those of us who never mind spoilers (and who dislike being startled, sometimes the two are related) and those who can't bear spoilers. Then, here, [livejournal.com profile] krylyr wonders which of the Star Wars movies to show first to his kids, and why.

Whoa, I hadn't thought of that. With my own kids, they'd already seen the first three on VCR before Phantom Menace (if that's the right name of the first prequel) appeared. So they saw those in the same order we did, only on TV, not in the theater, without all the wondering and excitement between.

Oh. The Monday following the first appearance of that first prequel, I was talking to some parents at school. Several maintained sadly that kids these days were jaded, and gone forever was the delirious excitement that possessed us when the first SW film came out summer of '77. Everyone, including kids, had got too sophisticated, and no one would ever feel that way about a movie again. I didn't want to say anything--this was just after release weekend, no reactions yet at large--I was afraid I'd sound like a tedious snob if I talked about how I'd been checking my watch, how despite the beauty of the sets, and some nifty bits, the dialog had seemed awfully wooden at times. There was only the faintest glimmer of the crackling fun of the first film. I did say that my son did not want to see it again, unlike my brother in 1977, at exactly the same age.


Okay, seque up. The next two have come out, each with jaw-dropping effects and devastatingly cement-heavy dialog and directing despite the actors' valiant efforts. But then the first three come out on DVD, and of course we get the set, and rewatch them all shiny and remastered, unlike our grainy VCR tapes taken off the TV with a third of the screen cut out.

As we're watching it, the familiar old lines take on new ironies, meanings, twists. So . . . would it be better to make someone sit through the first three, so that older ones take on all that freight of added meaning? Kids don't notice wooden dialog, do they? The perfect age for the prequels seems to be about ten. Or maybe the best entry place would be with the original Star Wars film (now called A New Hope if I'm not mistaken), so that the viewer experiences the story the way we did. That way the viewer can bring to those wooden first three all the story baggage, to make them slightly more palatable.

Has anyone experienced them differently than those of us who were around in '77? Or maybe there is no answer that fits everyone, as Mrissa brought up with respect to spoilers, and connecting bits of story across the arcs.

All my life I've enjoyed the reread effect. That is, I love the first surprise of a good piece, and then there's the reread, when I look forward to revisiting the story now that I have its shape, and how I missed this bit, or that bit reverberates with meanings hidden on my first encounter, etc.
sartorias: (Exordium)
Okay, the con is in full swing, and on the door of this panel is a topic that might attract those of us with wrinkles and grizzled heads:

When did you first see Star Wars and did it change anything for you?

My personal yatter below the escape route, er, cut:
Read more... )
sartorias: (Exordium)
Okay, the con is in full swing, and on the door of this panel is a topic that might attract those of us with wrinkles and grizzled heads:

When did you first see Star Wars and did it change anything for you?

My personal yatter below the escape route, er, cut:
Read more... )

Star Wars

Oct. 9th, 2005 07:18 am
sartorias: (Default)
I didn't like any of the prequels, except for the exquisite production values, but my single viewing of each gave me enough info that the data presented itself in my head at various points during my watching last night, adding a layer. Like on board the Death Star, when Vader grabs Leia, I thought, you don't know it yet, but that's your daughter. You know, that kind of thing.

Certain lines still play with their old pizazz.

It's easy to cavil at where Lucas obviously didn't have control of his material (especially in designing the force and differentiating between the dark and light sides) but that's all fish/barrel. What I enjoyed was the energy, the byplay between the characters. I was distracted once or twice by the observations of time: wow, Bespin looks so...so seventies! Whereas at the time I thought it looked so pretty. And the computers all looked as simple as sixties TV ones, though at the time I thought them so complicated and impressive. The thing is, I still love these movies. We both do. We'll probably watch the third tonight.

Star Wars

Oct. 9th, 2005 07:18 am
sartorias: (Default)
I didn't like any of the prequels, except for the exquisite production values, but my single viewing of each gave me enough info that the data presented itself in my head at various points during my watching last night, adding a layer. Like on board the Death Star, when Vader grabs Leia, I thought, you don't know it yet, but that's your daughter. You know, that kind of thing.

Certain lines still play with their old pizazz.

It's easy to cavil at where Lucas obviously didn't have control of his material (especially in designing the force and differentiating between the dark and light sides) but that's all fish/barrel. What I enjoyed was the energy, the byplay between the characters. I was distracted once or twice by the observations of time: wow, Bespin looks so...so seventies! Whereas at the time I thought it looked so pretty. And the computers all looked as simple as sixties TV ones, though at the time I thought them so complicated and impressive. The thing is, I still love these movies. We both do. We'll probably watch the third tonight.

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