Exordium

May. 17th, 2011 06:59 am
sartorias: (Default)


The Phoenix in Flight has gone live.
I'm going to insert a courtesy cut here, because below is a lot of blather about its history.
Read more... )

Exordium

May. 17th, 2011 06:59 am
sartorias: (Default)


The Phoenix in Flight has gone live.
I'm going to insert a courtesy cut here, because below is a lot of blather about its history.
Read more... )
sartorias: (Default)
Today I'm on the front page, thanks to the behind-the-scenes hard work of Vonda McIntyre.

Book View Cafe was started up a couple of years ago, spearheaded by Sarah Zettel, the idea being that since contracts didn't mention ebooks until this past decade, authors with backlists suspended in limbo had a way to bring back those earlier books in a new form. Some have taken the opportunity to rewrite them (as Dave Trowbridge and I are doing with Exordium), some are reissuing them as is. And some are issuing new books instead of waiting for the years-long bottleneck of the usual submission/print process.

Book View Cafe is run entirely on volunteer labor.There are a bunch of other consortiums starting up, as well as authors issuing their own titles (I'm sure by now everyone has heard about Amanda Hocking and her wild success), or choosing the crowd-funding route, where they put up content and a tip jar.

It's fascinating to watch these experiments happen, and how people are approaching the age-old problem of getting the word out. Many are depending heavily on Facebook, others have misgivings about self-advertising, saying that too much of that means no one gets heard, it's like having your daily blog feed filled with nothing but ads.

The thing I like about all these experiments is that anyone can get in the game, if you have a computer and can team up with graphic artists and html jockeys and people who can edit and proof. Success is up to the readers.
sartorias: (Default)
Today I'm on the front page, thanks to the behind-the-scenes hard work of Vonda McIntyre.

Book View Cafe was started up a couple of years ago, spearheaded by Sarah Zettel, the idea being that since contracts didn't mention ebooks until this past decade, authors with backlists suspended in limbo had a way to bring back those earlier books in a new form. Some have taken the opportunity to rewrite them (as Dave Trowbridge and I are doing with Exordium), some are reissuing them as is. And some are issuing new books instead of waiting for the years-long bottleneck of the usual submission/print process.

Book View Cafe is run entirely on volunteer labor.There are a bunch of other consortiums starting up, as well as authors issuing their own titles (I'm sure by now everyone has heard about Amanda Hocking and her wild success), or choosing the crowd-funding route, where they put up content and a tip jar.

It's fascinating to watch these experiments happen, and how people are approaching the age-old problem of getting the word out. Many are depending heavily on Facebook, others have misgivings about self-advertising, saying that too much of that means no one gets heard, it's like having your daily blog feed filled with nothing but ads.

The thing I like about all these experiments is that anyone can get in the game, if you have a computer and can team up with graphic artists and html jockeys and people who can edit and proof. Success is up to the readers.
sartorias: (Default)
Over at Jim Hines' I'm up for
First Book Friday.

I got into publishing through a back door--the first stuff out was packager stuff under other names, so there was never any "debut author" hoopla. And that was many years after I'd started submitting stuff, so mine is not what you call a comet career launch in any sense. More like the turtle who is having a very slow day.

The funniest memory, looking back, are those teachers' faces, judging the writing contest when I was in grade 8. (I sneaked a peek at them through the little glass insets in the classroom doors.)

Now, at the other side of adulthood, I salute those teachers giving up their lunch hour for what must have seemed like a busman's holiday, but at least they didn't have to grade any of it. And of course there was no chance any of them were going to read all those pages . . . but until I got that glimpse I'd had this inner image of a crowd of teachers glommed with total fascination by that story, wig-lifting and all. There was even a naval chase!
sartorias: (Default)
Over at Jim Hines' I'm up for
First Book Friday.

I got into publishing through a back door--the first stuff out was packager stuff under other names, so there was never any "debut author" hoopla. And that was many years after I'd started submitting stuff, so mine is not what you call a comet career launch in any sense. More like the turtle who is having a very slow day.

The funniest memory, looking back, are those teachers' faces, judging the writing contest when I was in grade 8. (I sneaked a peek at them through the little glass insets in the classroom doors.)

Now, at the other side of adulthood, I salute those teachers giving up their lunch hour for what must have seemed like a busman's holiday, but at least they didn't have to grade any of it. And of course there was no chance any of them were going to read all those pages . . . but until I got that glimpse I'd had this inner image of a crowd of teachers glommed with total fascination by that story, wig-lifting and all. There was even a naval chase!
sartorias: (Default)
Horses for Writers, by Judith Tarr is something I read in draft--and I've already gone back to her rough draft four or five times to research horse facts.

This book is where ebooks come into their own, because of the URLs. I imagine she'll sell this to some publishing company for a print run, and the URLS will be there to be typed onto your machine, but the fun of this book is, if you have a reader wifi capable, you can click the URL and boom, another level opens for you on that subject! It's a fun read, crampacked with good info--How far can a horse travel in a day? What does a horse eat? When is a brown horse really a sorrel (or a bay, or a dun)? What do tack and withers and canter mean? How fast can a horse run? What happens when a foal is born? How have humans and horses evolved together over the millennia? And above all, what mistakes do writers most often make when writing about horses, and how can the educated writer avoid them?

This aspect of ebooks is something I've thought about this summer. As some know I've been writing about another world for over fifty years. I'm busy rewriting a lot of those stories, and some are published, but there are too many to wait for the glacial pace of publishing, so I'm going to put the middle range of them out as ebooks, and I'm thinking of imbedding connections and in one, a tertiary storyline as URLs. See what happens, if anyone likes reading that way. (I know I would--frequently, for example, when I'm reading Mary Shelley's journal or Claire Clairmont's, I'll get Byron's out and check the entries for that date, then buzz over to the Shelley Papers and check there.)

Anyway, enough about me. I began this post as a heads up about an enormously useful and fun book. As soon as I get a kindle with wifi I'm buying another copy, just so it can ride around being instantly useful when I'm doing notes on the road.
sartorias: (Default)
Horses for Writers, by Judith Tarr is something I read in draft--and I've already gone back to her rough draft four or five times to research horse facts.

This book is where ebooks come into their own, because of the URLs. I imagine she'll sell this to some publishing company for a print run, and the URLS will be there to be typed onto your machine, but the fun of this book is, if you have a reader wifi capable, you can click the URL and boom, another level opens for you on that subject! It's a fun read, crampacked with good info--How far can a horse travel in a day? What does a horse eat? When is a brown horse really a sorrel (or a bay, or a dun)? What do tack and withers and canter mean? How fast can a horse run? What happens when a foal is born? How have humans and horses evolved together over the millennia? And above all, what mistakes do writers most often make when writing about horses, and how can the educated writer avoid them?

This aspect of ebooks is something I've thought about this summer. As some know I've been writing about another world for over fifty years. I'm busy rewriting a lot of those stories, and some are published, but there are too many to wait for the glacial pace of publishing, so I'm going to put the middle range of them out as ebooks, and I'm thinking of imbedding connections and in one, a tertiary storyline as URLs. See what happens, if anyone likes reading that way. (I know I would--frequently, for example, when I'm reading Mary Shelley's journal or Claire Clairmont's, I'll get Byron's out and check the entries for that date, then buzz over to the Shelley Papers and check there.)

Anyway, enough about me. I began this post as a heads up about an enormously useful and fun book. As soon as I get a kindle with wifi I'm buying another copy, just so it can ride around being instantly useful when I'm doing notes on the road.
sartorias: (Watcher at the Window)
Inspiration, the projects that take over your brain, and mention of my next book at the Bookview cafe blog.
sartorias: (Watcher at the Window)
Inspiration, the projects that take over your brain, and mention of my next book at the Bookview cafe blog.
sartorias: (Madam Pirate--against all flags)
In celebration of her birthday, Laura Anne Gilman is giving away a signed copy of a bunch of September releases, including one of mine.

Here is your cut for those who object to pimpage:
Read more... )
sartorias: (Madam Pirate--against all flags)
In celebration of her birthday, Laura Anne Gilman is giving away a signed copy of a bunch of September releases, including one of mine.

Here is your cut for those who object to pimpage:
Read more... )
sartorias: (1554 S)
Elsewhere on BVC, Nancy Jane Moore talks hereM about a book called Fans, Friends, and Followers by Scott Kirsner.

Nancy Jane lists his main points, some of which I agree with, some I don't. Like, Sell merchandise. If I wanted to sell merchandise, I would be a store clerk. Just the thought of handling people's money and dealing with tax paperwork and standing in those horrible long lines at the post office is profoundly depressing.

More positively, Create only what you can create in the sense that nobody really knows what the market "wants" matches my experience. It seems to me that nobody has ever predicted with any trustworthy regularity what the market wants, mostly there's been a sort of slow but frantic chase to keep putting out things similar to what's popular until it's no longer popular, at which time the train jumps the tracks and chugs after the new popular thing.

But creating what you love is half the equation, because there's a good chance that someone else has been craving just that thing. The second half is the tough part: figuring out how to make that thing appeal to others.

Embrace conversation makes good sense to me, because that's what I come to the net for. But conversation and selling things seem two different beasties.

The one that seems most useless is Figure out how to bring in audience participation. Judging from my huge flist, and other linked things I see each day, there are very few who've figured out how to bring in audience participation.

Encouraged (or exhorted) to self-publicize, many writers post about their work constantly. Blogs like that begin to feel like commercials to me, though that might be just because I have so many writers on my daily list here. Some writers track and post about every single review (the praise ones usually with some variation on "By Jove they got it!" appended), or offer contests and prizes in the form of books or bookmarks. How is that working for folks--do new readers click those links, or compete for the prizes, or are those participatory events for already existing friends? Because from the distance it looks like the ones for whom that stuff is successful were already popular. I wonder if those things draw new readers.

The one thing that emerges from the chaos that is the net is that word of mouth is extremely powerful, something governments have always known. But how to harness it?
sartorias: (Default)
Chapter 3 of Wren Journeymage for those following it.

Elsewhere on BVC, Nancy Jane Moore talks hereM about a book called Fans, Friends, and Followers by Scott Kirsner.

Nancy Jane lists his main points, some of which I agree with, some I don't. Like, Sell merchandise. If I wanted to sell merchandise, I would be a store clerk. Just the thought of handling people's money and dealing with tax paperwork and standing in those horrible long lines at the post office is profoundly depressing.

More positively, Create only what you can create in the sense that nobody really knows what the market "wants" matches my experience. It seems to me that nobody has ever predicted with any trustworthy regularity what the market wants, mostly there's been a sort of slow but frantic chase to keep putting out things similar to what's popular until it's no longer popular, at which time the train jumps the tracks and chugs after the new popular thing.

But creating what you love is half the equation, because there's a good chance that someone else has been craving just that thing. The second half is the tough part: figuring out how to make that thing appeal to others.

Embrace conversation makes good sense to me, because that's what I come to the net for. But conversation and selling things seem two different beasties.

The one that seems most useless is Figure out how to bring in audience participation. Judging from my huge flist, and other linked things I see each day, there are very few who've figured out how to bring in audience participation.

Encouraged (or exhorted) to self-publicize, many writers post about their work constantly. Blogs like that begin to feel like commercials to me, though that might be just because I have so many writers on my daily list here. Some writers track and post about every single review (the praise ones usually with some variation on "By Jove they got it!" appended), or offer contests and prizes in the form of books or bookmarks. How is that working for folks--do new readers click those links, or compete for the prizes, or are those participatory events for already existing friends? Because from the distance it looks like the ones for whom that stuff is successful were already popular. I wonder if those things draw new readers.

The one thing that emerges from the chaos that is the net is that word of mouth is extremely powerful, something governments have always known. But how to harness it?
sartorias: (Default)
While at Horse Camp, I had a borrowed mini-computer called an EEE. Nifty in many ways, it was tiny and very hard to control, so I didn't post entries.

A few expressed in interest in Wren Journeymage, Chapter Two, which went up on Thursday.

Today, Kids and a sense of history.
sartorias: (Default)
While at Horse Camp, I had a borrowed mini-computer called an EEE. Nifty in many ways, it was tiny and very hard to control, so I didn't post entries.

A few expressed in interest in Wren Journeymage, Chapter Two, which went up on Thursday.

Today, Kids and a sense of history.

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