sartorias: (Default)
Taking time out from the LOTR read to remind folks that this year's Con or Bust fundraiser has opened, and Rachel Manija Brown's and my entry is a personalized (any way you wish) copy of REBEL, which comes out next month.

There are also tons of other goodies, from books to food items! Take a look!
sartorias: (handwritten books)
Con or Bust offer:

At last, book three of The Change is coming out in mid-May. We will be sending a personalized copy to the winner of the auction.

view and comment on the post there.

SmithSher_Brown_Rebel_133x200_Final

Welcome back to Las Anclas, a frontier town in the post-apocalyptic Wild West. In this perilous landscape, a schoolboy can create earthquakes, poisonous cloud vipers flock in the desert skies, and the beaches are stalked by giant mind-controlling lobsters.

The tyrant king Voske has been defeated, but all is not peaceful in Las Anclas. Ross’s past comes back to haunt him, Jennie struggles with her new career, Mia faces her fears, Felicite resorts to desperate measures to keep her secrets, Kerry wonders if Las Anclas has really seen the last of her father, and shy Becky Callahan may hold the key to a dangerous mystery.

In Rebel, long-held secrets of past and present are revealed, family ties can strangle as well as sustain, and the greatest peril threatening Las Anclas comes from inside its walls.
sartorias: (handwritten books)
Originally posted by [livejournal.com profile] jimhines at Fundraiser for Transgender Michigan

I met Rachel Crandall more than twenty years ago, when I first started volunteering at the Listening Ear crisis center in East Lansing, Michigan.


I remember some of the conversations we had as she was coming out, and some of the challenges she talked about. We fell out of touch for a while, as happens sometimes. When we reconnected again years later, I was amazed at the things Rachel had accomplished, including founding the International Transgender Day of Visibility and working with her partner, Susan Crocker, to start what I believe was the first transgender helpline in the country.Transgender Michigan Helpline image


Transgender Michigan was founded in 1997, and continues to run one of the only transgender helplines in the country, available 24/7 at 855-345-8464.


We know transgender youth are at a higher risk of depression and suicide, and these coming months and years could be very difficult. Therefore, I’ve enlisted some very generous SF/F friends to put together a fundraiser to help Transgender Michigan continue their important work providing support, education, and advocacy.


 


24 Auctions in 24 Days


Each day at noon (with the exception of Thanksgiving weekend), I’ll post an auction from one of the people listed below. It could be for autographed books, a manuscript critique, a Tuckerization (where you get to be a minor character in an upcoming book), or something else altogether. Bidding will take place in the comments, one bid at a time.


The following day at noon, I’ll close the bidding and notify the winner. The winner then donates their bid to Transgender Michigan and sends me the receipt, at which point I’ll send your information to the donor so they can hook you up with your winnings.


Transgender Michigan is a 501(c)(3) Michigan nonprofit corporation, which means your donation is tax deductible.


Note: I will wait until 10 minutes after the last bid to close an auction. That will hopefully reduce the impact of last-second sniping.


 


Bonus Raffle from DAW Books


That’s right, there’s more! My publisher, DAW Books, has agreed to give away:


6 Tad Williams Bundles: each bundle includes one copy of Otherland: City of Golden Shadow (hardcover first edition, first printing)  plus 1 Advance Review Copy of The Heart of What Was Lost.


6 DAW December Release Bundles: each bundle includes one copy of all DAW December titles: Dreamweaver, Tempest, Alien Nation, and Jerusalem Fire, plus a bonus ARC (dependent on stock).


Have I mentioned before how amazing my publisher is?


How can you win one of these awesome bundles? That’s easy. At any time between now and the end of the fundraiser, simply donate $5 to Transgender Michigan and email me a copy of the receipt at jchines -at- gmail.com, with the subject line “DAW Raffle Entry.”


Each week, I’ll pick at least one donor to win their choice of either a Tad Williams or a December Release bundle from DAW. (Which means the earlier you enter, the better your chances of winning!)


You can donate more than $5 if you want more than one entry. For example, donating $20 would get you four entries. However, you can only win a maximum of one of each bundle.


This is separate from the individual auctions. Winning an auction does not count as a raffle entry.


 


Our Donors


Here are the donors for the fundraiser.



#


Yesterday was the International Transgender Day of Remembrance, memorializing those “who were killed due to anti-transgender hatred or prejudice.” In my mind, that makes today the perfect time to work to make things better.


My thanks to everyone who helped make this happen. Please spread the word about the fundraiser, and about the individual auctions as they go live.


And if you want a hint about tomorrow’s auction? Well…let’s just say the Force will be with you, always.






Mirrored from Jim C. Hines.

Sassafrass

Aug. 13th, 2015 08:30 am
sartorias: (desk)
The thing about being old and somewhat arthritic is that I have a general, small level of pain all the time. It's the price one pays post sixty, but the downside is, that sometimes the aches intensify so gradually that it hits me, whoa, could I be sick? The last three days, I've had a high fever, which means the headache that prevents me from reading, so I've been listening to audio books and music. And the music has pretty much been Sassafrass's Nine Worlds piece, Sundown. The close harmonies, the quick words, have generated the most amazing images.

Well, anyway, I would really, really like to see them make their last goal in the next 48 hours. I want the subsidiary CD's promised. If any of you have an interest, or like their work, here's the data in the link.

Okay, I've sat up long enough now. Back to bed, and I think Baldur and Hel are up next.
sartorias: (Fan)
Forwarded from [livejournal.com profile] rachelmanija, who has a story in:


Her Private Passion: More Tales of Pleasure and Domination. It's only 99c.

Five smoldering tales of women’s passion for women. Five best-selling authors bring you their hottest lesbian historical stories of desires that cannot be denied.

From elegant aristocrats, cross-dressing soldiers, and sultry sirens, to naughty nuns, seductive spies, and innocent young ladies, some women must dominate... and some women must submit.

“Bound in Silk and Steel,” by Rebecca Tregaron. The lovely courtesan-spy Perrine travels to Serenissima to seduce and ensnare the noblewoman Fiorenza. But in the sensual abandon of Carnival, power can shift in the blink of an eye, the turn of a mask, the flick of a rope…

"Convent Discipline," by Honey Dover. Alessandra isn't looking forward to becoming a nun, but in strict medieval Italy, her family has given her no other option. When her training as a novice is taken over by the lovely Julia, Alessandra learns that submission can mean much more than prayer.

"Found," by Victoria Janssen. In the midst of the American Civil War, Clodia flees slavery and certain death. Found by her escaped friend Diana, who is serving as a man in the Union army, Clodia fears she can't be forgiven for the past.

"Spanked On The Prairie," by Isla Sinclair. When Emily Welland misbehaves on the Canadian prairie, she is due for a spanking from firm but beautiful Miss Grant. But little does she know the sensual lesbian delights in store for her.

“The Ocean's Maid,” by Mona Midnight. All Sarah wanted was to find her sister, lost to the mermaids more than a year ago. But in the world of the sirens, she finds welcoming arms... and the promise of the forbidden pleasures she has denied herself for so many years. Will she return to the surface? Or will she succumb to the temptations of life under the sea?

The companion volume of gay historical stories, His Prize Possession: Tales of Pleasure and Domination, is also available.
sartorias: (Dog nosy)
I am suspicious of a lot of fundraisers with heart-rending pleas but diffuse goals. I suspect the true goal is pocket lining. But my daughter looked into this one, which has a specific goal: easing the overcrowding in SoCal shelters by flying dogs that have homes waiting. They figure it's $88 per dog. Maybe it will even give other dogs a bit more of a chance, too.

Anyway, more here.
sartorias: (Fan)
I've mentioned a few times (and do not expect anyone to remember, which is why I'm mentioning it again) that I've got this fun novel idea called "Commando Bats"--basically what happens when a bunch of old women get powers.

The idea has been simmering away waiting for an excuse to start it, but with everything else going on, kept receding like a mirage, until I got an invitation to submit something to a proposed anthology called Athena's Daughters.

I really liked this interesting bunch of women and their publishing group, Silence in the Library. (One of them is a jet pilot in the military, how cool is that?) I liked the project, and since mine met the requirements--strong women, magic . . . I wrote the beginning of the novel as a short story. (Well, short for me, at 8k words). The story doesn't get much into Hera, who I always thought one of the most interesting of the mythological figures, conflicted as the stories are about her, but my key bats are definitely in it, getting a start to their new careers as superheroes.

If you've hit the link, you'll see that it's a fundraiser, so that we and the artists will get paid. As fundraisers go, it's pretty modest. I hope anyone interested with a few bucks to throw into the kitty will check it out, and be sure to watch the vid, shot in Washington D.C.

Thanks!
AthenasDaughters-cover-front-web
sartorias: (Fan)
If you donate to the Octavia E. Butler scholarship fund you can download this book of stories by Carl Brandon Society scholars who attended Clarion.

And wow. I read this anthology last week. Out of the entire anthology, only two stories didn't work for me, one because horror just isn't my cuppa, and the other had nifty ideas, but the execution never achieved liftoff for me. But otherwise? A guy whose family constantly hexes him, the worst being grandma who is dead, but that doesn't stop her . . . airship battles over nineteenth century America with monkey airship flyers . . . a story by Octavia Butler about an L.A. when speech is gone . . .enhanced humans and home . . . then three stories I thought were intensely powerful, so brilliantly vivid that a week later, keep popping images up in my head:

"Falling into the Earth," by Shweta Narayan

“Légendaire,” by Kai Ashante Wilson

“The Salt Water African,” by Lisa Bolekaja


This offer is open until the anniversary of Octavia E. Butler's birthday in June.
sartorias: (desk)
I hope you'llcheck out the video first--it's very short.

Judith Tarr wrote a YA novel that couldn't be pegged in the usual boxes. Her agent and several editors said "I love it, but I'm not sure . . ." where to put it on shelves? How to market it? Whatever. This post is not aimed at slanging agents and editors, who are dealing with the volcano that is publishing nowadays as well as the rest of us.

It's all about the story. I've read this story. I think it has the potential to be a grabber. But she is also the sole support of nine Lipizzaner horses, with no financial safety net, and while self-publishing gives writers the power to be creative, it doesn't pay the bills until the book is out. So she's trying Kickstarter to earn an advance while she takes the time to rip a good story down to bare metal in order to rebuild it as a great one.

Even a spare buck will help, if enough would like to sponsor her.
sartorias: (desk)
I hope you'llcheck out the video first--it's very short.

Judith Tarr wrote a YA novel that couldn't be pegged in the usual boxes. Her agent and several editors said "I love it, but I'm not sure . . ." where to put it on shelves? How to market it? Whatever. This post is not aimed at slanging agents and editors, who are dealing with the volcano that is publishing nowadays as well as the rest of us.

It's all about the story. I've read this story. I think it has the potential to be a grabber. But she is also the sole support of nine Lipizzaner horses, with no financial safety net, and while self-publishing gives writers the power to be creative, it doesn't pay the bills until the book is out. So she's trying Kickstarter to earn an advance while she takes the time to rip a good story down to bare metal in order to rebuild it as a great one.

Even a spare buck will help, if enough would like to sponsor her.
sartorias: (Default)
Con or Bust has a few more days, and there is a lot of really nifty stuff offered.

Here is an index.

Here is the status post.

Some recent good news about Viable Paradise grads:
This year's Nebula and associated awards) nominees are up, and they include:

Nebula:
N.K. Jemisin, Novel: The Kingdom of Gods VP VI
Jake Kerr, Novelette: "The Old Equations", VP XIV
Ferrett Steinmetz, Novelette: "Sauerkraut Station" VP XIII

Norton:
Greg van Eekhout, Novel: The Boy At the End of the World, VP III

Re Nebula and Norton, the latter was really difficult as there were so many excellent books published last year. Really difficult for choosing for award purposes, but excellent for reading purposes.

But I was glad to see that many liked some of my personal favorites enough to nominate them: Among Others, which I burbled about a lot last year, Ultraviolet, by R. J. Anderson, which was unpredictable and [insert superlatives here], The Freedom Maze, which I plan to read again soon.
sartorias: (Default)
Con or Bust has a few more days, and there is a lot of really nifty stuff offered.

Here is an index.

Here is the status post.

Some recent good news about Viable Paradise grads:
This year's Nebula and associated awards) nominees are up, and they include:

Nebula:
N.K. Jemisin, Novel: The Kingdom of Gods VP VI
Jake Kerr, Novelette: "The Old Equations", VP XIV
Ferrett Steinmetz, Novelette: "Sauerkraut Station" VP XIII

Norton:
Greg van Eekhout, Novel: The Boy At the End of the World, VP III

Re Nebula and Norton, the latter was really difficult as there were so many excellent books published last year. Really difficult for choosing for award purposes, but excellent for reading purposes.

But I was glad to see that many liked some of my personal favorites enough to nominate them: Among Others, which I burbled about a lot last year, Ultraviolet, by R. J. Anderson, which was unpredictable and [insert superlatives here], The Freedom Maze, which I plan to read again soon.
sartorias: (desk)
Tomorrow begins the fundraiser for Con or Bust, which helps people of color attend SFF cons. I wanted to link to this essay by N. K. Jemisin. What it emphasizes to me, at least, are the dangers of making assumptions about groups of people.

We're going to do that, of course. Human socializing is about hierarchies, but I believe the more aware we are of unquestioned assumptions, the closer we come to weaving an enduring civilization. Meantime, sharing resources with this person here, and that one there, spins the threads.

So. There are already tons of goodies up at the site. I plan to bid on some of those auctions. I am also trying to think up what I can offer.

I'm nearly done with my Magic for Terri offerings--my maps all got made and sent, and I'm slowly working through two of my books, annotating them with handmade and printed pictures and notes. Wow, it's fun, though my drawing is very slow, and *kaff* not exactly professional.

Here's my question, what would people bid on if I offered it? I can make more maps (I have one copy of the big Remalna map left, which I could color and decorate) or draw scenes or characters. Because of the way my head works, unfortunately I can't tuckerize people, though I know that's a really easy way to raise a few bucks for the cause. (Or hundreds, if you're Neil Gaiman.) I realize I might have used up all the good will people have.
sartorias: (desk)
Tomorrow begins the fundraiser for Con or Bust, which helps people of color attend SFF cons. I wanted to link to this essay by N. K. Jemisin. What it emphasizes to me, at least, are the dangers of making assumptions about groups of people.

We're going to do that, of course. Human socializing is about hierarchies, but I believe the more aware we are of unquestioned assumptions, the closer we come to weaving an enduring civilization. Meantime, sharing resources with this person here, and that one there, spins the threads.

So. There are already tons of goodies up at the site. I plan to bid on some of those auctions. I am also trying to think up what I can offer.

I'm nearly done with my Magic for Terri offerings--my maps all got made and sent, and I'm slowly working through two of my books, annotating them with handmade and printed pictures and notes. Wow, it's fun, though my drawing is very slow, and *kaff* not exactly professional.

Here's my question, what would people bid on if I offered it? I can make more maps (I have one copy of the big Remalna map left, which I could color and decorate) or draw scenes or characters. Because of the way my head works, unfortunately I can't tuckerize people, though I know that's a really easy way to raise a few bucks for the cause. (Or hundreds, if you're Neil Gaiman.) I realize I might have used up all the good will people have.
sartorias: (Default)
Reposting--some have had trouble getting to LJ because of DDOS attack, and anyway, it's now live!

Terri Windling, whose name you have got to be familiar with, really needs help. She's been in dire straits before, and has always toughed it out. That she consented to permit the fantasy community to rally around for her suggests to me that the need is pretty steep.

So here a bunch of awesome people have organized one of the fundraisers in which you receive goodies donated by writers, artists, and creative types of all kinds. Go look--there is some really nifty stuff there. I sure plan to go shopping.

As for my additions, you can find them here and here and here are my offers--with more to come.
sartorias: (Default)
Reposting--some have had trouble getting to LJ because of DDOS attack, and anyway, it's now live!

Terri Windling, whose name you have got to be familiar with, really needs help. She's been in dire straits before, and has always toughed it out. That she consented to permit the fantasy community to rally around for her suggests to me that the need is pretty steep.

So here a bunch of awesome people have organized one of the fundraisers in which you receive goodies donated by writers, artists, and creative types of all kinds. Go look--there is some really nifty stuff there. I sure plan to go shopping.

As for my additions, you can find them here and here and here are my offers--with more to come.
sartorias: (Default)
Via [livejournal.com profile] shweta_narayan The Carl Brandon Society is holding a prize drawing of five eReaders starting November 1st and ending November 22nd, 2010. The funds raised will benefit the Octavia E. Butler Memorial Scholarship, a fund that sends two emerging writers of color to the Clarion writers workshops annually.

Entrants will have the opportunity to win one of two (2) available Barnes & Noble Nooks, one of two (2) available Kobo Readers (with Wi-Fi), and one (1) Alex eReader by Spring Design. Drawing tickets cost one US dollar ($1).

In addition, each eReader will come pre-loaded with books, short stories, poems and essays by writers of color from the speculative fiction field. Some of the writers include N. K. Jemisin, Nisi Shawl, Alaya Dawn Johnson, Terence Taylor, Ted Chiang, Shweta Narayan, Chesya Burke, Moondancer Drake, Saladin Ahmed, Rochita Loenen-Ruiz, and there will be many more.

Go here for more info, and here to order tickets.

I love that the readers will come loaded with goodies. Yes, I can get those goodies on my own--in fact, I probably already have some. But it's like prezzies--it's a delight receiving good things that someone else picked out, and then there is the joy of discovery.
sartorias: (Default)
Via [livejournal.com profile] shweta_narayan The Carl Brandon Society is holding a prize drawing of five eReaders starting November 1st and ending November 22nd, 2010. The funds raised will benefit the Octavia E. Butler Memorial Scholarship, a fund that sends two emerging writers of color to the Clarion writers workshops annually.

Entrants will have the opportunity to win one of two (2) available Barnes & Noble Nooks, one of two (2) available Kobo Readers (with Wi-Fi), and one (1) Alex eReader by Spring Design. Drawing tickets cost one US dollar ($1).

In addition, each eReader will come pre-loaded with books, short stories, poems and essays by writers of color from the speculative fiction field. Some of the writers include N. K. Jemisin, Nisi Shawl, Alaya Dawn Johnson, Terence Taylor, Ted Chiang, Shweta Narayan, Chesya Burke, Moondancer Drake, Saladin Ahmed, Rochita Loenen-Ruiz, and there will be many more.

Go here for more info, and here to order tickets.

I love that the readers will come loaded with goodies. Yes, I can get those goodies on my own--in fact, I probably already have some. But it's like prezzies--it's a delight receiving good things that someone else picked out, and then there is the joy of discovery.
sartorias: (Default)
Okay, I'm trying to come up with stuff people would pay actual money for, to help raise cash for [livejournal.com profile] debsliverlovers. (Two people need expensive operations, the donor and the liver-needer, thanks to our lamentable health care system.)

The problem is finding something that I have that would be worth two cents to anyone else but me.

As I was sifting through all my stuff, I yanked out a pen drawing on cardboard, of Eowyn, I did back in 1968. Since I'm no artist, and I was in high school then, it's pretty insipid. Here's the thing, though--my son actually thought it was like 500 years old, because of the way the cardboard has aged! So I thought maybe somebody would buy it as a joke? Hang it in a bathroom, maybe, or a really dark hallway?

Anyway, here's hoping someone out there has a sense of humor. The cause is good, even if the art is terrible.



If you have some spare cash, help me feel slightly less dweeby for offering that . . . the link is here
sartorias: (Default)
Okay, I'm trying to come up with stuff people would pay actual money for, to help raise cash for [livejournal.com profile] debsliverlovers. (Two people need expensive operations, the donor and the liver-needer, thanks to our lamentable health care system.)

The problem is finding something that I have that would be worth two cents to anyone else but me.

As I was sifting through all my stuff, I yanked out a pen drawing on cardboard, of Eowyn, I did back in 1968. Since I'm no artist, and I was in high school then, it's pretty insipid. Here's the thing, though--my son actually thought it was like 500 years old, because of the way the cardboard has aged! So I thought maybe somebody would buy it as a joke? Hang it in a bathroom, maybe, or a really dark hallway?

Anyway, here's hoping someone out there has a sense of humor. The cause is good, even if the art is terrible.



If you have some spare cash, help me feel slightly less dweeby for offering that . . . the link is here

May 2017

S M T W T F S
  1 23 4 5 6
78 91011 12 13
14 15 16 1718 19 20
21222324252627
28293031   

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Most Popular Tags

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated May. 25th, 2017 12:42 pm
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios