sartorias: (desk)
While I was in New York, I was lucky enough to be a guest of Ellen Kushner and Delia Sherman. While I was there, Tremontaine was launched, with attendant publicity.

Of course I signed up--I love that story world, and Ellen's writing, and will be eager to see what others do while splashing in that world. Collaborative work can be so nifty, each bringing a new slant of light to create a spread spectrum effect. I also enjoy these new story telling ventures. (If you click the link above, you'll be taken to the Tremontaine section of Serial Box.)

This is not the only interesting venture in Fantasy of Manners. Well, Manners, anyway--I don't know how many of you are aware of the delightful "Madame C" on LiveJournal. I love the period voice and the acerb wit.

As I was talking to Ellen and Delia about books, writing, travel, the world, and people our age, then reading the Scalzi link above on the train (which I was in New York I was too busy going out and doing stuff to do much reading) it occurred yet again how Ellen's take on our generation was upper east coast, or New York POV. My particular age cohorts in L.A. or SoCal had a different experience. For one thing, no leather jackets--who could afford them, and also, the weather makes them a sweaty fashion thing. But we read a lot of the same books, bringing to them our varying experiences and perhaps drawing different ideas from them.

I particularly enjoyed seeing the reference to Trollope's autobiography and his rueful statement about "Big Bow Wow" works--those enormous books that range over politics and sport and church and state and above all manners, that were so popular in the long Victorian era. I love those books--and love Big Wow Wow fantasy as long as it keeps that tight focus on character as well as the vast matters. And isn't all one (generally lugubrious) one note.

But I also thoroughly enjoy close in Fantasy of Manners, and eagerly anticipate each new episode of the Serial Box. (The audio, by the way, is utterly ravishing)
sartorias: (Default)
For BVC blog day I brought forward a discussion we had here on fantasy and comedy of manners, because I think the topic is always timely, and sometimes different folks come by and have new things to say.
sartorias: (Default)
For BVC blog day I brought forward a discussion we had here on fantasy and comedy of manners, because I think the topic is always timely, and sometimes different folks come by and have new things to say.
sartorias: (Default)
[livejournal.com profile] bittercon is off and running! Great conversation on Why YA is Booming, and Limits and Stereotypes--do they limit or spur creativity?.

There's a nifty topic right in [livejournal.com profile] bittercon on heritage in fantasy.

Technically this topic on researching in difficult-to-find periods or places was meant for Friday, but hey, unlike cons Out There, we can have pre-discussion!

The topic I wanted to offer up, if anyone has an interest, is an old favorite around here, but it seems to me there are always aspects to be explored. That's because I keep seeing slangs and sneers thrown at Fantasy of Manners, usually by folks who pride themselves on their egalitarian high tech, scientific viewpoints.

Is Fantasy of Manners really hearkening back to days of yore, when everyone knew their place, and were content to stay in it? Or is it really subversive, as many afficionados claim--subversion implied as a good thing?
Read more... )
sartorias: (Default)
[livejournal.com profile] bittercon is off and running! Great conversation on Why YA is Booming, and Limits and Stereotypes--do they limit or spur creativity?.

There's a nifty topic right in [livejournal.com profile] bittercon on heritage in fantasy.

Technically this topic on researching in difficult-to-find periods or places was meant for Friday, but hey, unlike cons Out There, we can have pre-discussion!

The topic I wanted to offer up, if anyone has an interest, is an old favorite around here, but it seems to me there are always aspects to be explored. That's because I keep seeing slangs and sneers thrown at Fantasy of Manners, usually by folks who pride themselves on their egalitarian high tech, scientific viewpoints.

Is Fantasy of Manners really hearkening back to days of yore, when everyone knew their place, and were content to stay in it? Or is it really subversive, as many afficionados claim--subversion implied as a good thing?
Read more... )
sartorias: (Default)
Fantasy of Manners, or FOM. We've seen it defined. We've even seen it called 'Mannerpunk', which some claim to be an offshoot, others a shorthand term. I hate that term, it sounds to me like the cool look of FOM without any depth or breadth. We know pretty much which books are and aren't. What isn't settled is, are the New Wavers right in scorning it as reactionary tosh? "Fantasy of Manners, you've got friggin' aristocrats fer goshsakes, how reactionary is that?" Under the daring clothes and the crossing of social lines we still have our innies and our outies, what are we doing? We say we're shaking up social assumptions of privilege and power . . . are we?
sartorias: (Default)
Fantasy of Manners, or FOM. We've seen it defined. We've even seen it called 'Mannerpunk', which some claim to be an offshoot, others a shorthand term. I hate that term, it sounds to me like the cool look of FOM without any depth or breadth. We know pretty much which books are and aren't. What isn't settled is, are the New Wavers right in scorning it as reactionary tosh? "Fantasy of Manners, you've got friggin' aristocrats fer goshsakes, how reactionary is that?" Under the daring clothes and the crossing of social lines we still have our innies and our outies, what are we doing? We say we're shaking up social assumptions of privilege and power . . . are we?

Reading

Oct. 4th, 2006 10:54 am
sartorias: (Default)
Autumn seems to be rolling in for most in this hemisphere where my butt is currently aseat; spring is on its way for those over the southern horizon. So what is everybody reading today?

I've got an arc of the third Wrede/Stevermet collaboration, The Mislaid Magician, or Ten Years After... (I am going to put an Amazon link here so I don't have to type out all the rest of the title.)

It is tremendous fun, and makes me think about what works when comedy of manners plus fantasy works. One has to know the rules not just to read it but to write it. That does not mean one has to accept the rules--how obvious one is being about skewering the social rules both spoken and unspoken slides the bead from comedy to satire to parody--but one has to know them, and also, in order to make the magical overlay work, one has to know those rules as well...including what changes magic rings on society.

Reading

Oct. 4th, 2006 10:54 am
sartorias: (Default)
Autumn seems to be rolling in for most in this hemisphere where my butt is currently aseat; spring is on its way for those over the southern horizon. So what is everybody reading today?

I've got an arc of the third Wrede/Stevermet collaboration, The Mislaid Magician, or Ten Years After... (I am going to put an Amazon link here so I don't have to type out all the rest of the title.)

It is tremendous fun, and makes me think about what works when comedy of manners plus fantasy works. One has to know the rules not just to read it but to write it. That does not mean one has to accept the rules--how obvious one is being about skewering the social rules both spoken and unspoken slides the bead from comedy to satire to parody--but one has to know them, and also, in order to make the magical overlay work, one has to know those rules as well...including what changes magic rings on society.

Reading

Jul. 26th, 2006 04:41 pm
sartorias: (Default)
Ellen Kushner's The Privilege of the Sword.
Read more... )

Reading

Jul. 26th, 2006 04:41 pm
sartorias: (Default)
Ellen Kushner's The Privilege of the Sword.
Read more... )
sartorias: (Default)
Did you see the series of essays over on [livejournal.com profile] crooked_timber here--and, I just discovered thanks to [livejournal.com profile] coalescent that Clarke responds here.

I do wish that this entire series was in print--it's deadly to try to read so much online, especially when the timer is ticking. But I was especially caught by Clarke's statement here:


...I rather like this use of fantasy, partly because is that it’s something we do so much better than the literary fiction people. Literary fiction sticks resolutely to the human. But the world seems to me so much bigger than that.


Oh, yes, yes, yes!
sartorias: (Default)
Did you see the series of essays over on [livejournal.com profile] crooked_timber here--and, I just discovered thanks to [livejournal.com profile] coalescent that Clarke responds here.

I do wish that this entire series was in print--it's deadly to try to read so much online, especially when the timer is ticking. But I was especially caught by Clarke's statement here:


...I rather like this use of fantasy, partly because is that it’s something we do so much better than the literary fiction people. Literary fiction sticks resolutely to the human. But the world seems to me so much bigger than that.


Oh, yes, yes, yes!
sartorias: (Default)
Had not the kids claimed the television last night, as usual, I probably would have been tempted to watch some more Firefly. But as it happened I'd saved a book pretty much all year for summer reading because I really wanted to be able to savor it. I decided to take it out last night, and after chores, before bed, sank into my reading chair with Madeleine Robins' Petty Treason.
Read more... )
sartorias: (Default)
Had not the kids claimed the television last night, as usual, I probably would have been tempted to watch some more Firefly. But as it happened I'd saved a book pretty much all year for summer reading because I really wanted to be able to savor it. I decided to take it out last night, and after chores, before bed, sank into my reading chair with Madeleine Robins' Petty Treason.
Read more... )

Clarke

Sep. 24th, 2004 05:31 am
sartorias: (Default)
Due to the miserable heat and dryness I've been up until midnight or later reading. Finished the Clarke last night.

Brief impressions, spoiler-free:
Read more... )

Clarke

Sep. 24th, 2004 05:31 am
sartorias: (Default)
Due to the miserable heat and dryness I've been up until midnight or later reading. Finished the Clarke last night.

Brief impressions, spoiler-free:
Read more... )

Reading

Sep. 18th, 2004 10:06 am
sartorias: (Default)
Some wonderful discussions about High Fantasy on various LiveJournals over the past few days. I think [livejournal.com profile] papersky summarized my feelings about the best of it; I don’t read a lot of it, as many don’t work for me. I considered posting about that, but kept coming up against the wall of “it’s just taste” which is basically a dead end discussion-wise.

Jonathan Strange

Began the night before last, and last night I read far too late, making it nearly until page 100. It’s delightful. Clarke has yet to introduce the main character, except through quotations and a couple of mentions from the narrator, who steps on stage for the first time on page 24, after a series of footnotes. Clarke’s prose is delightful, a seamless blend of modern and nineteenth century. I am not reminded of Austen so much as Trollope and Thackeray.

The beginning is leisurely, yet the story begins to build as soon as we meet Mr. Norrell. So far, what we learn about magic echoes more from Sylvia Townsend Warner and other pre-Tolkien writers than those who came after him.

I hope others will read it—maybe we could discuss it over on the Fantasy of Manners LJ, once enough have, so we can risk spoilers; I know [livejournal.com profile] shsilver is bucketing along trying to finish this weekend so he can be the better armed for his interview with Clarke next week.

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