Yuletide

Dec. 30th, 2012 07:00 am
sartorias: (Fan)
If the subject of fanfiction troubles you, please pass by.
Read more... )

Various

Dec. 11th, 2011 05:27 am
sartorias: (Default)
Today's BVC blog post is about Men and shipping--in the fanfiction sense.

Doing catchup things, but also working ahead on goodies for Terri. While I was busy with my colored pencils for one project, I watched Pulse: A Stomp Odyssey which was so good I forgot I was supposed to be coloring. Not just percussive music makers from all over the world recreating traditional dance and sounds, but the way people will get into rhythm while performing the tasks of daily living. And Kodo drums! And Eva Yerbabuena, whose phenomenal flamenco I had never seen before. I had to come back in here and look her up.

Also watched and greatly enjoyed was Welcome Back, Mr. McDonald, whose logline had immediately grabbed me: a housewife wins a contest to have her radio play produced. Live. The rehearsal goes well, except that the leading actress, Nokko, hates the name of her character. And the hero, who is a rival actor, gets a burr up his nose about the fact that she gets changes that he doesn't . . . and so the writer watches helplessly as the story spins out wilder and wilder. Meanwhile, we watch the effect of it on a truck driver who was channel surfing.

There's so much insight here into the writing process, especially group writing dynamics and processes with a deadline bearing down (right here we can see one way that incredibly bad films get made), creativity--and how no one can control how a project (good or bad) impacts the audience. Or how family members will react to a writer's stories.

Various

Dec. 11th, 2011 05:27 am
sartorias: (Default)
Today's BVC blog post is about Men and shipping--in the fanfiction sense.

Doing catchup things, but also working ahead on goodies for Terri. While I was busy with my colored pencils for one project, I watched Pulse: A Stomp Odyssey which was so good I forgot I was supposed to be coloring. Not just percussive music makers from all over the world recreating traditional dance and sounds, but the way people will get into rhythm while performing the tasks of daily living. And Kodo drums! And Eva Yerbabuena, whose phenomenal flamenco I had never seen before. I had to come back in here and look her up.

Also watched and greatly enjoyed was Welcome Back, Mr. McDonald, whose logline had immediately grabbed me: a housewife wins a contest to have her radio play produced. Live. The rehearsal goes well, except that the leading actress, Nokko, hates the name of her character. And the hero, who is a rival actor, gets a burr up his nose about the fact that she gets changes that he doesn't . . . and so the writer watches helplessly as the story spins out wilder and wilder. Meanwhile, we watch the effect of it on a truck driver who was channel surfing.

There's so much insight here into the writing process, especially group writing dynamics and processes with a deadline bearing down (right here we can see one way that incredibly bad films get made), creativity--and how no one can control how a project (good or bad) impacts the audience. Or how family members will react to a writer's stories.
sartorias: (Default)
I was really surprised once when someone who looks down on the sf and f genre insisted that fictional and literary continuations of classics is metafiction but sweaty stories about Kirk and Spock 'doing it' is all faaanfiction. (Insert lofty tone for first, dismissive tone for second.)

I thought, you don't understand the difference, but then I thought, maybe I don't. So I put up a brief blog post above, and discussion is welcome.
sartorias: (Default)
I was really surprised once when someone who looks down on the sf and f genre insisted that fictional and literary continuations of classics is metafiction but sweaty stories about Kirk and Spock 'doing it' is all faaanfiction. (Insert lofty tone for first, dismissive tone for second.)

I thought, you don't understand the difference, but then I thought, maybe I don't. So I put up a brief blog post above, and discussion is welcome.

Holmesiana

Jul. 26th, 2011 11:40 am
sartorias: (Default)
Vonda McIntryre has written a Sherlock Holmes scientific romance called "The Adventure of the Field Theorems."

Sometimes continuations are just plain fun!

Holmesiana

Jul. 26th, 2011 11:40 am
sartorias: (Default)
Vonda McIntryre has written a Sherlock Holmes scientific romance called "The Adventure of the Field Theorems."

Sometimes continuations are just plain fun!
sartorias: (Default)
There is some further debate about the legitimacy of fanfiction going around. I don't mean the copyright issue (which is vexing indeed) but its legitimacy as literature.

I've been mulling this off and on for a day or two, and my tentative conclusion is that the best literature is transformative, and that the line between published or original fiction and fanfiction disappears when we look at transformative works.

Transformative literature takes the familiar and uses it to offer new ideas--ask new questions--try a different paradigm. Ariosto and Spenser could not have written their monumental works if the reading world hadn't already been familiar not only with the Arthurian mythos, but the fiction of earlier writers.

Like published literature, fanfiction has its bad and brilliant, its phatic and its experimental. It also has its editors (called beta readers, and these betas can be far more ruthless than many overworked editors these days), and its dependence on word of mouth completely cuts out the "packaged best seller" aspect of the publishing world.

Anyway, I also think that many who say that fanfiction is "all just porn using someone else's characters" and badly written could use some pointers to the good stuff--though I'm aware that tastes differ. So I'm hoping that anyone who cruises by here who has some transformative favorites will provide links to their own favorites, so that a spectrum might be offered.

Two quick examples (the dogs are barking to go for walkies): The Ivory Horn and Captain Holly's Last Command.
sartorias: (Default)
There is some further debate about the legitimacy of fanfiction going around. I don't mean the copyright issue (which is vexing indeed) but its legitimacy as literature.

I've been mulling this off and on for a day or two, and my tentative conclusion is that the best literature is transformative, and that the line between published or original fiction and fanfiction disappears when we look at transformative works.

Transformative literature takes the familiar and uses it to offer new ideas--ask new questions--try a different paradigm. Ariosto and Spenser could not have written their monumental works if the reading world hadn't already been familiar not only with the Arthurian mythos, but the fiction of earlier writers.

Like published literature, fanfiction has its bad and brilliant, its phatic and its experimental. It also has its editors (called beta readers, and these betas can be far more ruthless than many overworked editors these days), and its dependence on word of mouth completely cuts out the "packaged best seller" aspect of the publishing world.

Anyway, I also think that many who say that fanfiction is "all just porn using someone else's characters" and badly written could use some pointers to the good stuff--though I'm aware that tastes differ. So I'm hoping that anyone who cruises by here who has some transformative favorites will provide links to their own favorites, so that a spectrum might be offered.

Two quick examples (the dogs are barking to go for walkies): The Ivory Horn and Captain Holly's Last Command.
sartorias: (Default)
This Sunday's BVC blog takes some thoughts I had last year, and carries them on a step.
sartorias: (Default)
This Sunday's BVC blog takes some thoughts I had last year, and carries them on a step.
sartorias: (Default)
As the season of Yuletide Madness approaches (imagine waking up Yule morning with a story written just for you) the discussion of fan fiction also came up at WFC, in all its complexity.

There are many writers whose reaction to fan fiction is the visceral one, akin to discovering a slug in your salad. Others are flattered, or shrug it off, or don't mind as long as no one expects them to read it. Most of the viewpoints I've talked about in other posts, but one came up that I hadn't heard before, and that is how fan fiction can actually bring readers to a canon. What happens is that a really good fan fiction writer posts a story, her fans read it, and love the setting and characters so much they go out to seek the story source.

One person pointed out that that is exactly what is happening with some of the established continuations of storylines and worlds--like the complexity that Deborah Ross is bringing to the Darkover world, as she continues that storyline. And ditto with the Avalon storyline that Diana L. Paxson is exploring--coincidentally also from the creative pen of Marion Zimmer Bradley. I found that so interesting that I might do an interview with them, when their new books come out early next year.

From there the discussion branched out to other really successful continuations.

More on elves... That line creeps between cracks of intention just gives me neck prickles.

How Japanese artists saw Western dress
sartorias: (Default)
As the season of Yuletide Madness approaches (imagine waking up Yule morning with a story written just for you) the discussion of fan fiction also came up at WFC, in all its complexity.

There are many writers whose reaction to fan fiction is the visceral one, akin to discovering a slug in your salad. Others are flattered, or shrug it off, or don't mind as long as no one expects them to read it. Most of the viewpoints I've talked about in other posts, but one came up that I hadn't heard before, and that is how fan fiction can actually bring readers to a canon. What happens is that a really good fan fiction writer posts a story, her fans read it, and love the setting and characters so much they go out to seek the story source.

One person pointed out that that is exactly what is happening with some of the established continuations of storylines and worlds--like the complexity that Deborah Ross is bringing to the Darkover world, as she continues that storyline. And ditto with the Avalon storyline that Diana L. Paxson is exploring--coincidentally also from the creative pen of Marion Zimmer Bradley. I found that so interesting that I might do an interview with them, when their new books come out early next year.

From there the discussion branched out to other really successful continuations.

More on elves... That line creeps between cracks of intention just gives me neck prickles.

How Japanese artists saw Western dress
sartorias: (Default)
Via [livejournal.com profile] telophase, here.

I think his numbers are off--really popular fanfiction can reached thousands of readers--but his main points? See my head bobbing like a dashboard doll.
sartorias: (Default)
Via [livejournal.com profile] telophase, here.

I think his numbers are off--really popular fanfiction can reached thousands of readers--but his main points? See my head bobbing like a dashboard doll.
sartorias: (Default)
via [livejournal.com profile] janni, a sympathetic and sensible article about fanfiction and encouraging kids to write.
sartorias: (Default)
via [livejournal.com profile] janni, a sympathetic and sensible article about fanfiction and encouraging kids to write.
sartorias: (Default)
I read the Atlantic Monthly article with the graph that resonated with me, but put off others.

I found very little else that resonated--only that one bit about some of the girl readers I knew, and have encountered over the years of teaching. The writer gave a vivid example of reading to learn the "how tos" of life, but I really think that point is a given. Her "I hate Y.A. novels; they bore me" was certainly daunting.

Enough of that--there's the link above if you want to read it all. Here's what I've been thinking about in re Twilight, and the Harry Potter phenom, and the "boys don't read" observations. Just as tastes vary not only from person to person but in a single person over time, so does the experience of reading. Is it possible that girls are more likely to make reading a social act rather than a solitary one? Because what first drew me to reading about the history of the novel, specifically the early novels of the 1600s and the rise of the salons, was how women swiftly organized themselves as soon as they found one another and a shared venue for expression.

Here are some quick impressions from my own non-academic and entirely sporadic reading.

The Renaissance brought about a revival in learning, with an especial focus on classical literature. The Renaissance contributed not just new ideas, but a new paradigm--the idea that the world could be different. From monarch to middle class, the use of classical vocabulary gave you style points--meanwhile, the content of the classics led to extrapolations in various forms of writing about what the ideal world could be . . . which in turn led to ideas about what the ideal man could be. Of course this "man" was assumed to be literate, and Castiglione exhorted in his book of social climbing, The Courtier, "He must be of noble birth."

But though the language of classical literature was male, guess who else was reading? With the spread of wealth came leisure time, and as women had been denied much involvement in seignorial concerns, they turned to books. Women read, talked, penned reams of letters.

In the 1600s a woman's written work became enormously popular: Madame Scudėry, whose novels were not just romances, but long conversations and careful details about courtly behavior. A lot of those conversations were published separately in the latter part of the century as manners manuals. They were meant to depict an ideal of civilized life--but eager young women read them in hopes of emulating those up the ranks, to better their lives.

Meanwhile, Louis XIII's court was so uncouth that a remarkable woman named Madame Rambouillet opened her house in 1618, and for three decades the creme de la creme of French literati came to her place, instead of the king's court, to speak about refined love, and other polite subjects. She designed the ruelles, or alcoves, which were to become a standard of most salons; at first made so that the temperature of the room could be controlled, these intimate little partial rooms appealed so strongly that other hostesses raced to make their own.

The definition of public and private was changing. To be private, and intimate, among chosen people, was also to be exclusive. Madame du Deffand, a famous salonniere of the mid-18th Century, took eighteen months to design and furnish her place, to a very specific design. No detail was deemed too trivial; the buttercup yellow silk wallpaper in her entertainment rooms was copied by most wannabe salonnieres throughout Europe.

What did all this mean? The romance is tied up in the betterment of life--the happy ending if all live up to a standard. Unfortunately, the focus here was the betterment of an exclusive society, rather than the betterment of all. Or rather, the two things conflicted, which caused rifts among women publishing in the years before the Revolution. Not surprisingly aristos wanted to hold onto power and privilege, and women born lower down on the totem pole felt that civilization ought to benefit all.

During the patriarchal nineteenth century, there was one calling where women could hold their own with men: writing, and reading.

It's interesting to me, watching the remarkable organization of fanzine fandom (specifically fan fiction) over the past thirty years, done mostly by women. What's going on underneath fanfic? A whole lot of stuff. Women writers exploring sexual questions is usually the first thing brought up (or mudball slung); but there is so much more going on. The taking of familiar characters to extrapolate improvements to society--the determination that one can have a happy ending if this, this, and this is done--the very statement that "This is what I like in a story. Write it for me" are all interesting aspects of reading, writing, and social action. And I see mostly women doing it. Why is that? Is it just because I'm a woman that I'm mostly seeing women, or is there a social stratum that just doesn't appeal to all the guys reading out there?
sartorias: (Default)
I read the Atlantic Monthly article with the graph that resonated with me, but put off others.

I found very little else that resonated--only that one bit about some of the girl readers I knew, and have encountered over the years of teaching. The writer gave a vivid example of reading to learn the "how tos" of life, but I really think that point is a given. Her "I hate Y.A. novels; they bore me" was certainly daunting.

Enough of that--there's the link above if you want to read it all. Here's what I've been thinking about in re Twilight, and the Harry Potter phenom, and the "boys don't read" observations. Just as tastes vary not only from person to person but in a single person over time, so does the experience of reading. Is it possible that girls are more likely to make reading a social act rather than a solitary one? Because what first drew me to reading about the history of the novel, specifically the early novels of the 1600s and the rise of the salons, was how women swiftly organized themselves as soon as they found one another and a shared venue for expression.

Here are some quick impressions from my own non-academic and entirely sporadic reading.

The Renaissance brought about a revival in learning, with an especial focus on classical literature. The Renaissance contributed not just new ideas, but a new paradigm--the idea that the world could be different. From monarch to middle class, the use of classical vocabulary gave you style points--meanwhile, the content of the classics led to extrapolations in various forms of writing about what the ideal world could be . . . which in turn led to ideas about what the ideal man could be. Of course this "man" was assumed to be literate, and Castiglione exhorted in his book of social climbing, The Courtier, "He must be of noble birth."

But though the language of classical literature was male, guess who else was reading? With the spread of wealth came leisure time, and as women had been denied much involvement in seignorial concerns, they turned to books. Women read, talked, penned reams of letters.

In the 1600s a woman's written work became enormously popular: Madame Scudėry, whose novels were not just romances, but long conversations and careful details about courtly behavior. A lot of those conversations were published separately in the latter part of the century as manners manuals. They were meant to depict an ideal of civilized life--but eager young women read them in hopes of emulating those up the ranks, to better their lives.

Meanwhile, Louis XIII's court was so uncouth that a remarkable woman named Madame Rambouillet opened her house in 1618, and for three decades the creme de la creme of French literati came to her place, instead of the king's court, to speak about refined love, and other polite subjects. She designed the ruelles, or alcoves, which were to become a standard of most salons; at first made so that the temperature of the room could be controlled, these intimate little partial rooms appealed so strongly that other hostesses raced to make their own.

The definition of public and private was changing. To be private, and intimate, among chosen people, was also to be exclusive. Madame du Deffand, a famous salonniere of the mid-18th Century, took eighteen months to design and furnish her place, to a very specific design. No detail was deemed too trivial; the buttercup yellow silk wallpaper in her entertainment rooms was copied by most wannabe salonnieres throughout Europe.

What did all this mean? The romance is tied up in the betterment of life--the happy ending if all live up to a standard. Unfortunately, the focus here was the betterment of an exclusive society, rather than the betterment of all. Or rather, the two things conflicted, which caused rifts among women publishing in the years before the Revolution. Not surprisingly aristos wanted to hold onto power and privilege, and women born lower down on the totem pole felt that civilization ought to benefit all.

During the patriarchal nineteenth century, there was one calling where women could hold their own with men: writing, and reading.

It's interesting to me, watching the remarkable organization of fanzine fandom (specifically fan fiction) over the past thirty years, done mostly by women. What's going on underneath fanfic? A whole lot of stuff. Women writers exploring sexual questions is usually the first thing brought up (or mudball slung); but there is so much more going on. The taking of familiar characters to extrapolate improvements to society--the determination that one can have a happy ending if this, this, and this is done--the very statement that "This is what I like in a story. Write it for me" are all interesting aspects of reading, writing, and social action. And I see mostly women doing it. Why is that? Is it just because I'm a woman that I'm mostly seeing women, or is there a social stratum that just doesn't appeal to all the guys reading out there?
sartorias: (Default)
[livejournal.com profile] alecaustin has what I thought a very compelling question: here: what are the differences (in motivation & content) were between fanfic and writing that isn't fanfic but is still responding to/in dialogue with prior works?

Wow. I think first I want to know what kind of medium. I've been listening to a lot of hip hop, and hoo boy do the artists there dialog with one another, with personal history written in song, and with fiction.

Let's say it's just stories. The huge, huge communities of fanfic, and also vid communities, make it clear that the Internet has enabled people to engage with story in a new way. It's always been there. Some see the medieval Arthuriana as a shared world project akin to fanfic, everyone riffing off one another's stories, others see it differently. There have been well known fanfic endeavors, like the Baker Street Irregulars and various people who wrote Barsetshire stories.

But now, there are fanfic communities, because fanfiction writing doesn't seem to exist as a solitary expression of art. It flourishes in community. But there are also phenomena like the current vampire rage. How much are authors in dialogue with one another as they build on certain expectations? Alec has a fascinating question--he explains more in his post.

June 2017

S M T W T F S
    1 2 3
4 56 78 910
11 1213141516 17
1819202122 2324
2526 27282930 

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Most Popular Tags

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated Jun. 28th, 2017 12:11 pm
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios