Flotsam

Apr. 2nd, 2017 10:25 am
sartorias: (handwritten books)
Okay, enough people have given me a thumbs up on LOTR rereading, so I will start that this week--on Saturday, as I'm running so dry on topics for BVC blog links. I have the book waiting on the nightstand.

Meanwhile, yesterday's mail brought a gift from a friend--what looks like a first edition (there probably wasn't a second) of Mary Chase's play, sort of novelized and illustrated, Mrs. McThing. One of Mary Chase's books was a childhood fave, and once the internet gave me access to such data, I was astonished to discover that she'd been a well-known playwright.

So I took an hour last night to do some exploring.

In the process of looking up the playbill for Mrs. McThing, I found out that one of the child actors was Brandon De Wilde. I thought, wow, a Hollywoodish name for a kid, and looked him up. Turned out that his parents were from Dutch extraction, and that was his name, no Hollywoodizing here, and furthermore he'd been a phenomenally famous kid actor--who unfortunately died very young (age thirty). Examples of his acting exist on YouTube, most pretty hard on the eyes.

The clearest one was his appearance on What's My Line, a show that I always heard about as a kid, but as my dad didn't have any interest in it, I never actually saw an episode, as we watched whatever he wanted to watch. So I ended up watching bits of other episodes, like the appearance of "Eleanor Roosevelt. The show ran for well over a decade--yet when you look at the set, you'd think it was a high school production. Early television reminds me of early novels: raffish, experimental, doing its best to sell to the mainstream.

One of the episodes had Groucho Marx as a panelist, and he destroyed the format with his constant cracks. So that led me to the show he hosted, You Bet Your Life, which looks even lower budget. The episodes are fascinating glimpses of fifties culture, especially the outtakes. From the glimpses there that audience came there for the bits that would be cut out of the actual airing. Pretty tame by today's standards.
sartorias: (handwritten books)
Kings and battles . . . timely, eh? What we need are heroes. I've been rewatching Nirvana in Fire because I need a dose of idealism, smart leadership, loyalty, and telling truth to power as an antidote to the news. Until that happens, today's BVC riff is about epics, and what I see as the lure.

Agree? Disagree?
sartorias: (handwritten books)
In 1971, sf and f scholar Thomas Clareson had some still-relevant insights into the sudden explosion of sf and f some five years previous. With a few quotes from his essay, I throw out a couple of ideas about why it happened. I'd love to discuss what you thing about why it happened. Here is the link.

GLS

Sep. 29th, 2016 08:37 am
sartorias: (purple rose)
For those who understand German, a fascinating new video blog series put together by Syrians who have had to relocate to Germany. Find it here.
sartorias: (1554 S)
So we're trading off holding down the fort between repair people showing up, eldercare-related medical visits, and voting, someone always having to be here for said repair people (you know that "Will arrive sometime between noon and six p.m." routine).

It occurred to me this morning as I walked the dog through the neighborhood that there are fewer signs than I remember in the past. That will probably change when we get closer to November (sigh) but I was thinking, why do people put those things up? Is anyone ever convinced by those bright colored signs? Or is it simply about tribalism, and marking your chosen group?

The only bumper sticker I ever put on a car was my ancient Rambler, after I got back from Europe and discovered that my sibs had been driving it all that year and had gotten into several accidents. In those days, nobody had insurance, or at least nobody in our neighborhood. So my car looked like a junk heap on wheels, making it totally irresistible to have a MY OTHER CAR IS A KLINGON BATTLE CRUISER on it.

Well, that was funny in 1972.
sartorias: (desk)
Some of my LiveJournal friends who live in Europe are deeply involved with helping to integrate the people coming through terrible danger to another culture and climate in hopes of a peaceful life. Now many of these refugees are beginning to speak as they strive to master new languages. I thought this video deserved sharing.
sartorias: (desk)
Reflections of immortality? Personal expression? Scam? Challenge? Looks at street art, rock art and possible meanings.

Bricolage!

Feb. 28th, 2015 06:51 am
sartorias: (desk)
Reprise on bricolage, after a bunch of related discussions online and at cons. Plus mentions of a couple books, including Andrea K. Höst's new release.

Moldova

Feb. 11th, 2015 02:55 pm
sartorias: (desk)
This looks really promising. Gorgeous music by Pizzetti in the first half, bonus.

Things!

Feb. 24th, 2014 06:12 am
sartorias: (Fan)
FINALLY recovering from three week cold--last week was the worst of all. For a couple days I couldn't even read, my eyes were so watery. And I am trying to catch up on LJ, though I may have to give up.

Not nostalgia, but a reflection on the material evidence of how our lives change.

What are your "things"?
sartorias: (Fan)
Steve Popkes's take on the two shows. I thought his approach interesting, coming from a comics vector.

Gender

Dec. 16th, 2013 06:03 am
sartorias: (Fan)
Via [livejournal.com profile] supergee, a gentle and thoughtful riff on why we need more than three genders.
sartorias: (handwritten books)
A look at how they were doing it a few centuries ago. Don't miss the nifty link to the Collier's Letter Rack book, which I wish I could afford.

Mind Meld

Jul. 18th, 2012 07:14 am
sartorias: (Default)
This week the subject is kings and queens in sf and f. Not surprising that some of us had parallel thoughts.

Mind Meld

Jul. 18th, 2012 07:14 am
sartorias: (Default)
This week the subject is kings and queens in sf and f. Not surprising that some of us had parallel thoughts.
sartorias: (Default)
If you can follow German, this trip through the book fair is worth seeing, I thought. Dieter Moor, a German journalist, talks to a variety of people about various kinds of genres--and what sells.

Via Cora Buhlert, who writes her posts in English, but often links interesting stuff in German, from politics to culture.

Edited to add: an interesting post about translating by [livejournal.com profile] green_knight, who freelances as a translator. (Talk to her if you want to get a book translated into German--her rates are reasonable.)
sartorias: (Default)
If you can follow German, this trip through the book fair is worth seeing, I thought. Dieter Moor, a German journalist, talks to a variety of people about various kinds of genres--and what sells.

Via Cora Buhlert, who writes her posts in English, but often links interesting stuff in German, from politics to culture.

Edited to add: an interesting post about translating by [livejournal.com profile] green_knight, who freelances as a translator. (Talk to her if you want to get a book translated into German--her rates are reasonable.)
sartorias: (Default)
I won a blog post for Con or Bust, so I asked [livejournal.com profile] oursin, who writes sharp and smart essays about culture, why she thought the Mitford family was still popular. She posted her answer here.

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